On Farming and Futures

Photo by Todd Baker

Whether or not I respond to each comment left on the blog, make no
mistake. I do read them.

This recently-posted comment, made by someone nicknamed “career woman” intrigued me:

As career woman and as mother I don’t understand how a woman does not work. Real woman must have it all: good job giving her financial independence and children who look at her personal example of being professional. This is how my grandmother lived, my mother and I live this way today. For me it is not encouraging story, it is back to darkness.

First, I must say that I appreciate anyone who takes the time to comment. I want to learn and understand how women (and men, for that matter!) view home management in our culture. Much of history pivots on the perspective of home and family. This comment is insightful.

But from my perspective, this comment misses a few essential points that I’d like to discuss. Feel free to weigh in on the conversation.

1. The statement, “I don’t understand how a woman does not work” doesn’t truly take into consideration the amount of work necessary to maintain a home. And while I understand that “work” in this context refers to punching a card at a place of business, I don’t understand why any woman believes her value hinges on her outside employment. Some of the most influencial women in history never had an employer outside the home.

2. The statement, “Real woman must have it all: good job giving her financial independence and children who look at her personal example of being professional” lacks a true comprehension of what a woman truly needs. Good jobs don’t always yield financial independence. Even if the job is high-paying, there is no guarantee that a woman’s life will be free of cancer…natural disaster…a collapsed economy–taking everything she has.

Additionally, women who want children can’t always have them. And, if a woman has children, her professionalism doesn’t necessarily produce children who love, honor, or respect her for it. From my perspective, the belief that true success hinges on a good job, financial independence, and children who take note of her professionalism…is like building a house of cards in front of a blowing box fan.

3. Finally, the statement, “For me it is not encouraging story, it is back to darkness” gives me pause. We have more tools at our disposal than ever before to manage our homes successfully. I’ve never advocated shutting off the electricity or spending an entire day making lye soap. The concept that being a full-time home manager is archaic simply because women did it thousands of years ago doesn’t mean it is “dark” or negative in any way. Farming is making a comeback. Recycling clothes and plant products is on the upswing. Minimalism–as as attitude and expression–is more popular than ever. But no one calls these choices, “darkness”–they are viewed as innovative because we’ve figured out how to do them better.

The reality is, women today are more educated, more prepared, and more interested in home management than ever before. This–like recycling or farming–isn’t a sign that we are regressing, but rather, that the choice to do so has been wise all along.

Thank you for your feedback!

Speak Your Mind

*